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Feldsott Lee Pagano & Canfield
Orange County Homeowners Association Law Firm

Homeowners' Association Boards Archives

Homeowners' association boards could have troubles with the city

Many of California's neighborhoods butt up against public lands. In some cases, the homeowners' association boards have entered into agreements with the cities in which they are located. For a variety of reasons, a board may end up with an issue concerning its agreements with the city.

Changes in California law for homeowners' association boards

The 2017 California legislative session saw some changes that affect residential communities. Some of the changes specifically apply to homeowners' association boards. Since these new laws may change the way HOAs work, it may be helpful to know what happened.

Who makes up homeowners' association boards?

Every organization has some kind of structure. Homeowners' association boards here in California and elsewhere are no different. Most are made up of the president, vice president and treasurer. More than likely, a secretary handles the paperwork, takes and keeps the minutes and handles the notifications. 

What Happens When A Sober House Moves In?

One particularly thorny issue facing some HOAs is that of sober houses popping up in their midst. A sober house is a residence that serves recovering drug addicts and alcoholics, allowing them a place to stay among similar individuals in recovery. Sober houses are not treatment centers, per se, but serve as support mechanisms for people pursuing similar goals of sobriety and reintegration into normal society.

Homeowners' Association Boards must maintain a delicate balance

Enforcing the rules is never fun since no one likes to be seen as the bad guy. Even when members of California Homeowners' Association Boards want to be more lenient on one homeowner but harsher on another, that is not advisable. If the board is seen as "playing favorites" or being unnecessarily hard on another homeowner, litigation may not be far behind.

HOA Board Fails to Pay $994, Loses Its Main Street at Auction

In one of the more interesting stories of the year, the prestigious Presidio Terrace neighborhood in San Francisco has lost one of its main streets and parking areas. The Presidio Homeowners Association apparently failed to pay a total of $994 in back taxes, interest and penalties and a block-long private street was auctioned off two years ago for $90,100.

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